The Difference Between A Pickup And A Pickup

One kind of pickup.

For the record, our film is hovering around 1 hour 44 minutes.

We just moved our portable editing suite (which isn’t really all the portable) from the yellow house in Athens, Ohio to a weathered cedar (not yellow) house on Cape Cod to see what effect a little sun and salt air has on the ol’ 1-44.  Our next stop will be back on location in southwest Minnesota … spreading out across South Dakota and maybe a little Wyoming… for pickups*.  Thankfully we won’t have to re-shoot any of the scenes with our actors but nonetheless, each pickup shot has to be planned and scheduled.  One example of a ‘pickup’ on our list is a boom shot of a tractor pulling a manure spreader into town, past the town line sign.  Why isn’t anything ever easy!?

We shot this on location somewhere around Tyler last summer and for our pickups, we have to wait until the countryside looks like this so the shots we get this year will match the shots we got last year. 

*in filmmaking, a pickup is a shot filmed after principle photography has ended.   It enhances the narrative and may be used for a transition, to fill in gaps, smooth or join cuts.  The need for a pickup often becomes obvious during the editing process.

p.s. Kathy’s Dad Howard (Barry’s stunt double) says he gets asked all the time when the film will be ‘out’ in fact the other morning at coffee he heard it was already out.

 

2018-05-23T03:28:53+00:00